The history of the famous Moscow baths is closely connected with the names of Sila Sandunov and Elizabeth Uranova, who were the actors of the court theater of the Empress Catherine the Second. Having married the lovers, the monarchess presented them with the diamonds, which Sandunov used to buy a land plot to establish the baths there. By 1808 the construction works had been finished.
The Sanduny became the center of public life of the capital. It was Sila Sandunov who first separated the baths into the gentlemen's and the ladies' departments (before everyone used to bathe in one room). Comfortable rooms with expensive furniture and silver tubs supplies were created for the noblemen. Ladies of the upper crust could come here accompanied by their dogs.

In 1890 the Sanduny were inherited by the millionaire's daughter Vera Firsanova. Her husband A.N. Gonetskiy decided to have the Sanduny reconstructed and transform the baths into a real palace. He had visited a lot of countries with long traditions of baths, had studied not only the architecture of the baths complexes, but also their technical arrangements.
When he returned to Moscow, Gonetskiy invited Boris Freidenberg, who was one of the best Viennese architects of the time, to work for him. His project was implemented in 1896.
Eclectic frontiespieces of the three-storied palace were created with the elements of baroque, rococo, Revival style, gothic, classicism and industrial style. However the extravagant architecture of the baths was far from becoming their main peculiarity. The new Sanduny were the revolution of the baths business – the engineering systems did not have any analogues in Moscow. Almost all technical innovations of the time found their application here.  

In 1991 The Sanduny Bath House entered the State record keeping system as the architectural monument of Moscow.
Nowadays as before The Sanduny Bath House is the model of the Russian bath and bathing recreation.
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